The BEST Kind Of Kettlebell Workout?

Saturday was beautiful here.

We took the kids over to a marshy area a the next town
south of us. They got to see the beginnings of Spring –

Birds in the air, fish in the ponds, and one of my son’s
favorites – ants, which he loves to stomp on.

My daughter, 15 months old, just loves to bend down,
put both hands in the dirt, pick it up, and eat it, much
to my wife’s dismay. LOL.

Anyway, as we were walking and talking, we started
discussing workouts. (Hey, what can I say – it’s always
on my mind…)

One of the things I was thankful for is that even though
I had just worked out the day before and REALLY pushed
it, I wasn’t overly-sore or tired.

Sure, I had some stiffness, but that was because I had
been foolish and worked out while angry.

(NEVER do that – I’ll explain some other time.)

But the point is, my workouts are regular enough and planned
in such a way that not only can I measure my progress
on a day-to-day and week-to-week basis to keep me
motivated –

The structure is wrapped around a long term plan, which
allows me to maintain my focus and not panic when things
in the short-term don’t look like they’re going to go my
way.

These are the best kinds of kettlebell workouts –

Ones planned around two key elements:

1. Strength

and

2. Technique

Here’s why –

1. Strength – without it you’re dead in the water. A lot of
people will want to argue this and say that “mobility” is
more important.

Oh really?

Babies have tons of mobility.

Yet for the first year to 18 months of their lives, their ability
to get around is severely limited.

Why?

Because they lack strength (and coordination). Like my
daughter who still wobbles a bit, especially when she
gets tired.

Strength gives you the foundation for everything else –

Work capacity, endurance, hypertrophy, fat loss.

Argue it however you want, but you have to be able to do
1 good rep before you can do 5 and 5 before 10… and so
on…

2. Technique – without it, you’re putting yourself at a big
disadvantage.

Technique allows you to lift your kettlebells in the most
efficient and safest ways possible.

Failure to do so results in either short or long term injury –

– Pulling with a rounded lower back instead of your hips…

– Pressing with an unstable shoulder joint can pinch your
rotator cuff tendon (so much fun)

– Failure to put your head in the right position can also
lock up your lower back

In short, failing to take your time to focus on your technique
and just going “balls out” is a surefire way to end up paying
for your orthopedic surgeon’s new set of golf clubs.

Here’s the best part about these “best” types of KB workouts –

When you spend your time focusing on them, you build
up momentum -

Like a snowball rolling downhill…

Your progress becomes not only guaranteed, but virtually
unstoppable.

How do you make sure you’re on the “right” strength
program and that you’re doing the “right” technique?

Simple.

Go here.

It’s the solution to most of your long and short term problems.

Talk soon.

Geoff

P.S. If you want to lose fat – you also need to make sure
that you’re strength and technique are up to snuff.

If not, your reps will be “junk” reps and you’ll be wasting
your time.

Work your strength and technique FIRST - then you’ll
be set up to do any fat loss program you want.

P.P.S. When you’re technique is dialed in, you can “push
it” really hard some times and not get crushed because
of it.

Sounds counterintuitive, I know. But it works great. Live
to fight another day and all that…

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