The Missing Component In 99% Of All KB Workouts

Have you noticed this?

All over Facebook everyone is talking about their workouts.

How much they pressed. How many reps of swings they
did.

Pick something.

It’s all over the Interwebz.

And you know something?

That’s great!

It’s accountability and motivation and social support and
those lead to results.

But you know what’s not on there in most cases?

The missing component to 99% of all KB workouts.

What’s that?

Active Recovery.

What’s that?

More than sleep, that’s what.

It’s actively taking steps to speed up the recovery process
so you can see your results sooner.

Think about that:

In a world where we want results yesterday, there are very
simple actions people can take to speed up there results.

But they don’t.

Why not?

Because they –

a) either don’t know about active recovery

b) they do know about active recover and discount its
importance

c) they know about it, acknowledge its importance, and
are too lazy to do anything about it

What are some examples of active recovery?

One of the simplest easiest things you can do are “Fast
and Loose” drills.

What are they?

Where you simply shake your muscles between sets.

(If you want to know specific drills, Pavel has a really good
DVD on it – you can get it on Dragondoor.com.)

Another example would be lying on the ground after your
workout practicing some deep breathing.

There’s a whole list of active recovery measures you can
take.

Now here’s the “trap” with active recovery:

You’ll be tempted to increase your training frequency.

Big mistake.

I still think the average person – you know, the one who has
a 40 hour a week job that has the unwritten expectation of
being a 50-60 hour a week job – a mortgage, 2.2 kids, bills
to pay – that sort of thing –

Only needs to train/workout 3 to 4 times a week.

The longer and more “stuff” in the workout, the lower the
frequency.

The shorter and simpler the workout, the higher the frequency.

Also, the harder the workouts, the lower the frequency (and
the more active recovery work you should be doing).

In fact, there’s some skill involved in designing kettlebell
programs – or any strength training / conditioning / fat loss
program.

That’s why I recommend you stop trying to put your own
program together and rely on the “pro’s” – the guys who
do this stuff for a living.

I’m betting you take your car to the mechanic’s when you
need work done.

Or call an electrician over when you have an electrical
problem – or a plumber when you have a plumbing
issue that you can’t fix with Drano.

Your body is infinitely more complicated than your car or
your house.

Why tinker with it and make up your workouts when you

can’t predict the outcome?

Speaking of predictable outcomes:

When you want to get strong, really, really strong (and you
should – strength forms the foundation for everything you
do – including losing fat or improving conditioning) –

Then you should get your copy of “Kettlebell STRONG!”.

In it, you’ll find the best program for improving your overall
total body strength – using the double KB clean + press.

What kind of results will you see?

Well that depends on you – your current strength levels,
your ability to follow directions – that sort of thing.

Here’s one very powerful success story:

Dan Anderson, a seasoned strength athlete, used the
“STRONG!” program inside “Kettlebell STRONG!.”

He could already clean + press a pair of Beasts (48kg
KBs) for 2 reps.

After he ran through the “STRONG!” program a couple
of times (and not the whole thing – just parts of it) –

He increased his Double Beast C+P by 300%!

He was able to C+P a pair of Beasts 8 times!

Here’s why that’s important to you:

Because the stronger you already are, the harder it is to
make progress.

Dan was already strong.

Chances are better than good you’re not as strong as
he is, so I expect that relatively speaking, you’ll make
even better progress than he did.

Get your copy of “Kettlebell STRONG!” here.

The “STRONG!” program can be done 2 or 3 days a week,
depending on your schedule and your stress levels.

That leaves plenty of time to add in your active recovery
measures.

Make sure you add them in and the sky’s the limit on your
success.

Talk soon.

Geoff

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